Saturday, 16 January 2016

Parker Street, 15th November 1940 - a bomb beside London City Airport DLR Station

On 15th November Coventry smoldered from the intense attack the night before but the attack was not renewed.  The Luftwaffe returned to London with the docks high on the list of targets.
I have not been able to find an account of what happened in Silvertown that night but this photo shows the aftermath:

Seemingly taken several years later (one source says 1944) it shows Parker Street, looking north to the Royal Victoria Dock.  The gap on the right hand side seems to be the site of cleared buildings that had been bombed.
Today, we might be more familiar with the view looking back towards the wartime cameraman from the docks, which now form London City Airport:

Planes are visible at the bottom of the photo, with the DLR railway station in the centre; just above that and to the right is the silver-coloured school building, and Parker Road runs to the right of the school and playground as we look at it.  The proximity in wartime to factories at the top of the photo, as well as the dock (now airport) are obvious.  This photo was taken by a Luftwaffe reconnaissance flight on 29th October, seventeen days before the bombing:

Factories and the dock facility are marked as targets.

The CWGC register of civilian war dead shows two people died in Parker Road that night and it seems likely a third person was fatally injured:
Annie Louisa Kerr died at 5 Parker Street, aged 35.  She was probably born Hannah Louisa Moles in 1905 in Silvertown and in 1911 she was living with her family in Silvertown where her father, Jim, was a general labourer in a rubber works.  She was known as Louisa and the family of seven lived in a three room house at 49 Andrew Street.  (Andrew Street may have partly disappeared under Silvertown Way but the remnant could be renamed Camel Street.  The area seems to have been popular with people moving from Ireland and one branch of the Moles family is found in that country).
By 1940 her parents lived in Woodford, about 7 miles north.  She was the wife of Walter E Kerr (probably Walter Edward Kerr born 1902).  They had been married 17 years and probably had two children Walter and Mary who would have been 15 and 14 at the time of the bombing.
Walter, her husband subsequently married Violet Moles, presumably a relative of Annie, four years later; and after the war they lived in the same street as Annie’s parents.  Walter died on 25th September 1948.
Elizabeth Maycock aged 75 and a widow died next door to Annie at Number 7.  CWGC only gives her husband’s first initial, J.  The 1901 Census shows John and Elizabeth Maycock living at 37 Ashburton Road, just the other side of the Royal Albert Dock, with their baby Alfred and adopted son Edward Booseby (born 1898).  John was 54, his wife’s age was said to be 36.  Sadly baby Alfred died shortly after the Census.)
They had been married on Christmas Day 1895, John was a widower (and the son of a soldier), while Elizabeth was a spinster aged around 35.  She was born Elizabeth Poolten but when her mother remarried she seems to have used her stepfather’s surname, Morris, for some time.  She may have been born in Mauritius in 1861 although the 1901 Census says she was born in Cape Town, South Africa; the family travelled around, younger siblings having been born in Gibraltar.
The CWGC record shows Elizabeth Larn died at Royal Albert Dock Hospital on the same day and her home address was 9 Parker Street; it seems reasonable to presume she was injured at home and died in hospital.  She was born Elizabeth Benmore on 9th December 1899 in Poplar.   In the 1901 Census the family lived at 5 West Street, Poplar, in the parish of All Saints, and her father’s occupation was general labourer.
The 1911 Census entry is unusual because Elizabeth lived at 1 Oak Road, Canning Town with her mother and 4 siblings; there is no mention of her father but further investigation shows him registered at 5 Oak Road with 7 others!
Her mother died in 1916 and her father (by then a ship’s fireman) died of pleurisy and pneumonia one year later.  On his death certificate Elizabeth was given as the informant and they were living at 41 Anne Street, Plaistow.
She married Thomas R Larn in 1921, and they had eight children: Thomas Charles (1921-1949); Thomas J b 1922; twins Doris and Winifred (1923-1923); Rosina b 1924; Frederick J b 1926; Sidney Alfred (1927-1978); and Irene E (1931-1932).


While I could not find an eye witness account of this particular riad, this is the story of one resident of Parker Street:

Note he refers to a bomb which deafened one of his sisters, and another sister almost falling into a bomb crater; these may have been the 15th November attack.

Monday, 4 January 2016

Clydeside 13th and 14th March 1941: timetable of the attacks

To date I have posted about individual incidents.  In this post, I have used two key books to try to construct a timetable for the air-raids on Clydeside on 13th and 14th March 1941.  I plan to add more detail and also to post on individual incidents

Notes
My referencing system is to use the first letter of my source (J=Jeffrey, for example), then the page number followed by the paragraph on that page e.g. J56.1 refers to Jeffrey’s book, page 56, paragraph 1.  The three source books are as follows:
J = Jeffrey “This Time of Crisis”
M = MacPhail “The Clydebank Blitz”
C = Cromwell “Bankhead: The Story of a Primary School at War”

Plain font indicates what appear to be statements of fact.  Italics show my comments and interpretation.  Bold font shows an event where the CWGC list of civilian war dead indicates people were killed. 

Thursday 13th March 1941
19.30 British military intelligence warning sent to Glasgow/Clydebank based on direction of German air force navigational beam. (M16.2)

20.30 Yellow warning (meaning ‘possible air-raid’) at Bankhead School AFS Watch Room. (C56.4)

20.40 (estimated) Purple warning (meaning ‘probable raid, all CD staff to stand-to’) received at Bankhead (“a few minutes after” the yellow warning at 20.30). (C56.4)

20.55 (estimated) Red warning (meaning ‘sirens to be sounded’) received at Bankhead (“shortly before 9pm”). (C56.4)

21.00 Bombing starts in Liverpool (M17.2).  McPhail suggested this was a diversion but “After the Battle Volume 2” shows the Germans planned to bomb both Clydeside and Merseyside in separate attacks.

21.00 (estimate) sirens in Clydebank (M15.2) based on “9 o’clock news had just started” on radio and teacher had just dismissed evening class at 9pm).  Chief Constable was at John Browns for scheduled test at 21.20 but they went off early. (M34.2)
Planes could be heard at Dalmuir as siren ended “approaching up the river”. (J56.1)

21.05 (estimate) “Almost from the moment the sirens sounded” flares falling in Clydebank (J56.3)
Hugh Campbell kicked incendiary from lean-to where ambulance stored at Singer’s Ground (M18.1, J56.1)
Possibly: fire started at Singer’s timber store (M19.3), possibly also Yoker Distillery

21.10 sirens in Glasgow (J55.6)

21.10 McLintock at Bankhead could hear planes overhead (C56.5)

21.15 (or 21.20) parachute mine at Bankhead School, according to Cromwell using school log, police and fire records, plus McLintock.

21.20 (estimate) bomb on 11 Queen Victoria Drive (J56.5)

21.23 bomb on Beardmore’s Diesel Works (J56.5)

21.25 (estimate) Rescue party and bus ambulance leave Esk Street depot to go to Bankhead School (“in under four minutes”, J57.2)

21.30 first part of main enemy force arrived over Clydebank (M18.2) – assume he is distinguishing between pathfinders dropping incendiaries and main bombing force.

21.30 (estimate) bomb on south side of Second Avenue opposite Albert Road (M18.2 quotes police officer that it was the first) – suggests higher numbers (163, etc) on Second Avenue.  Note that J57.5 implies it was later – but could be referring to a subsequent incident.
M32.2 story of Sergeant John MacLeod of 43 Albert Road on his way to duty when bomb demolished houses on either side of him – rescued people

21.30 (estimate) bomb on 57-59 Whitecrook Road (M18.2 says some people said this was the first bomb)

21.34 first aircraft of Luftflotte 3 over area, 4 He 111 of I/KG27 (nb records of Luftflotte 2 were destroyed, so these were not necessarily the first German aircraft), to 21.50

21.35 (estimate) bomb pub on corner of Beardmore Street and Dumbarton Road, witnessed by Hugh Campbell (J56.5) – timing estimated from time taken to report incident at Beardmore’s at 21.25, and Campbell to set off

21.35 German records say anti-aircraft fire started (M45.2)

21.38 bomb on Sick Children’s Hospital, Garscadden Road (J57.1)

21.40 (estimate) 21.38 incident “followed almost immediately” by bombs in Knightswood and Drumchapel: Trinley Road, Cowdenhill Avenue, Friarscourt Avenue, Baldwin Avenue, Fereneze Crescent, Fulwood Avenue
73 Friarscourt Avenue on fire from bomb in Friars Place
21.45 (estimate) Bombs at Eastcote Avenue, corner of Crow Road and Sackville Street and in Barclay Curle Recreation Ground opposite. 
Chronology unclear – assume Jeffrey 57.1 is in order

21.45 Dalmuir telephone, electricity and water had been cut off by now (J58.6)

21.45 (estimate) William Smillie and crew helped prop up shelter on Second Avenue (J58.4)

21.48 12 JU88 of I/KG54 arrive over target, to 22.55

Jeffrey (57.2) would put Bankhead School about here if in chronological order

21.51 600 Squadron Blenheim (Denby and Guest) spotted He-111 of KGr-100 (J61.3)

21.54 12 He 111 of KGr100 arrive over target, to 22.25

21.55 bomb on Boreland Drive, Knightswood, outside 77-79 (J59.2)

Elgin Street School damaged by blast from a parachute mine, equipment useless, electricity and water cut. Supplies and staff moved to shelters, 190 treated there.  (MacPhail 27.4 cf. J62.4)

Radnor Park School, Kilbowie Road, on fire “occurred early on” (M19.4)

22.00 (estimate) Campbell’s ambulance with Beardmore casualties damaged en route by a further bomb, two injured killed by manhole cover blown through roof of ambulance by blast (J 56.5)

22.00 (estimate) Wounded being put on ambulances at Whitecrook Road when another bomb exploded in Stanford Street, fatally injuring stretcher bearer. (J64.2)
Aitchison Blair factory in Stanford Street bombed early on, could be the same incident (M18.2)

22.00 (estimate) Livingstone Street – timing: must come after Second Avenue from Smillie’s evidence (J58.3 and J58.4) MacPhail implies this was an explosion early on and links it to story of number 69 (M18.2).

22.00 raid began on Hull, lasted until 02.25 (M17.2)

22.05 9 He111 of I/KG27 arrive over target, to 22.32

22.13 5 He111 of II/KG27 arrive over the target, to 22.25

22.15 (estimate) Bomb at junction of Kilbowie Road and Montrose Street, cratering road (M21.1, see J59.3 for further detail)

22.15 parachute mine at Lime Street, Victoria Park Drive South (J60.2)

22.15 parachute mine at Blackburn Street / Craigiehall Street (J60.2)

22.15 (estimate) (aircraft in the same wave as those bombing Lime St and Blackburn St) 2 mines into Fairfield’s – one failed to explode and was made safe on the 15th – another into Stephen’s Shipyard at Linthouse, and bombs at Shieldhall Wharf and the sewage works

22.20 (estimate) 148 Earl Street / 1571 Dumbarton Road bomb (J60.6) – no specific timing given.
Also bomb on Clyde Structural Engineering Plant, South Street (J60.6)

22.20 He-111 crashed near Drumshang Farm, Dunure, shot down by Denby & Guest (see 21.51) (J61.3)

22.25 Ju-88 III/KG106 shot down off Amble (J61.3)

‘Early in the raid’ Boquhanran School hit by incendiaries (and HE?), top floor blazing so casualties from FAP moved to playground shelter (J62.4) – I have put it here because casualties must have been there when fire started, well before 00.20 when they had to move again.

22.27 12 He111 of I/KG1 arrive over target, to 23.30

22.30 (estimate) Mary Haldane had just arrived at Livingstone St in ambulance when a bomb blew it on its side.  Another ambulance nearby hit – could be Campbell’s? (M28.2).

22.30 (estimate)  Smillie got a message that 57 Livingstone Street was alight but found more extensive fire and was there until Sunday 16th fighting it (M21.2).

22.35 Main Control (in Glasgow?) receive a message from superintendent of Knightscliffe AFS depot, reporting Bankhead depot wiped out according to runner’s message and asking for all help available (J57.2).

22.37 Glasgow Fire Service HQ received first call from Clydebank asking for assistance (two more before 22.50) (J71.4)

22.42 ‘landmine’ on Govan Road between Moss Road and Burghead Road (J61.4).  Followed by bombs on King George V Dock and Shieldhall Farm

Bombs at 394 Alderman Road, Kestrel Road, Baldric Road about here, if Jeffrey records events in chronological order even when he does not report timings (J62.1).

22.47 9 He111 of II/KG55 arrive over target, to 23.40

22.49 German records say anti-aircraft fire over Clydebank ended (M45.2)

22.50 7 Ju88 of III/KG1 arrive over target, to 23.17

22.55 28 Ju88 of KG77 start to arrive, to 02.54

23.00 (estimate) At Govan Road landmine site Ann Campbell goes into wreckage to comfort trapped neighbours (J61.4).

23.00 (estimate) Following appeals from Clydebank, 32 fire appliances despatched from Kirkintilloch, Coatbridge, Motherwell and Helensburgh.  Arrival delayed by unexploded bombs and not being familiar with area. (J71.4)

23.05 (“shortly after 2300 hours”) Yorkhill: HE and incendiaries at junction of Radnor Street, Overnewton Street and Argyle Street. Miss Cook’s dairy, 13 Radnor Street, damaged. Two explosions in Kelvingrove Park, one 30 yards west of bridge at Kelvin Way. (J62.2).
Stick of bombs on Finnieston, extensively damaged Lowrie’s bonded store in Hydepark Street (J62.2).

23.15 Clydebank Control Centre sent message to County Control Centre in Dumbarton for 8 rescue parties, quickly sent (M42.3)

23.15 (estimate) Messenger Neil Leitch arrives at Partick Fire Station (122 Beith Street) to report destruction of Bankhead Depot.  Sets off for return journey to Bankhead.

23.20 Great Western Road: mine at junction of Turret Road and Blairdardie Road.  Cloberhill Public School and adjacent United Free Church suffer damage (J62.3)
Incendiaries start fire at 66 Glanderston Drive
Railway cottages at Drumchapel nearly demolished

23.27 Partick: mine and 5 bombs at Peel Road, Dumbarton Road, Hayburn Street, Sandy Road near the fire station, Crow Road (J64.3).  Messenger Neil Leitch probably fatally injured at this time, CWGC records this happened at Sandy Road.

Bomb on Langholm Street about here, assuming Jeffrey lists events in chronological order (J64.4).
Also incendiaries on Dumbarton Road and bomb on Yoker Distillery (J64.4).  Jeffrey says this started huge fire, but other accounts suggest it was earlier, I think.

23.30 12 He111 of III/KG26 arrive over target, to 23.55

23.30 Hyndland: bomb at Queens Gardens (J64.5)
Mines at Turnbury Road (J64.5) and Dudley Drive / Airlie Street (J64.5)

23.30 Kennedy Street: mine lands without exploding (J66.1)

23.30 Anon nurse arrives at Radnor Park Church Hall which was Sector E ARP post – before midnight, after casualties start getting redirected there from Boquhanran School FAP.  There were about 60 casualties, no medical care (MacPhail 29.2, cf J62.5 who says this was at 02.00)

23.30 Pedro Hanbury (602 Squadron) disobeys orders and gets in short burst at bomber (J61.3)

23.35 Glen Crescent, Yoker, partly demolished (J66.1)

23.35 Yoker, bomb on 144 Earl Street (J66.2)

23.40 (estimate) “moments later” after 23.35, parachute mine on offices at Yarrow’s, collapses onto shelter underneath trapping 200 (J66.2)

23.45 (estimate) mobile unit from Knightswood Hospital despatched to Yarrows (J66.2), arrive about 10 minutes later

23.59 bomb on Florence Street off Ballater Street (McLure and MacIntosh’s factory) (J66.6)
Bomb on Chapel Lane in Gorbals (J66.6)

00.00 mine on Nelson Street in between tram and corner of Centre Street, causing building to collapse at 90 Nelson Street onto a shelter. (J66.6)
Mine on SCWS warehouse, Morrison Street (J66.6)

Windmillcroft Quay and West Street (Wordie’s Stables) about now, assuming Jeffrey lists events in chronological order (J68.4)

00.06 Report that Logan Street / Kilbride Street bombed, MacLachlan’s Cold Storage Warehouse (J68.3)

00.10 PC Archie Walker begins rescue at Logan Street

00.10 (“just after midnight”) Pattison Street number 12 (J59.1)

00.15 (estimate) Clydebank telephones to Control Centre fail “soon after midnight” (M35.2).  Electricity supply failed as well but not clear it was at this time. (M36.2)

00.25 (estimate based on “A few minutes later” after “just after midnight”) Pattison Street 5 (J59.1)
M26.1 confirms this sequence of events but might suggest a longer gap than “a few minutes” as the survivors had to recover from the initial shock, push beams apart that blocked their escape and then get across the road – maybe 15 minutes?

00.30 (estimate) Anon nurse gets to Western with injured baby

00.30 onwards (estimate) rescue at Yarrows by Joan Anderson, May Stanley (J66.3)

00.30 (estimate) Thomas Denholm rescues two women at Morrison Street (J68.3)

00.43 Mine on Queen Margaret Road, junction with Queen Margaret Drive (J69.5)
Second mine on 84 Kelvin Drive did not explode.

01.15 Bomb on Cleveden Road.  Same aircraft dropped mine on 16 Chelmsford Drive / Leicester Avenue and bomb in Dorchester Avenue(J69.7)

01.15 (estimate) Anon nurse and medical students leave Western

01.31 second landmine on Yarrows (J66.4)

Bombs in Dumbarton, Renfrew, Paisley, Barrhead, Millerston, Riddrie, Dalmarnock but no timings (J69.3 and 69.4)

02.00 Lull in the bombing (J70.2)

02.00 Head of FAP at Boquhanran School decides to evacuate to Janetta Street School (M28.1, note J62.4 says this was at 00.20)

02.15 (estimate) Anon nurse and medical students get back to Radnor Park Church Hall

02.15 (estimate) Men from Maryhill Barracks join rescue effort at Chelmsford Drive (J70.1)

02.22 15 Ju88 of II/KG76 start to arrive over target, to 03.10

02.30 (estimate) David McLintock left Bankhead School to go home to Kelso Street (C57.4)

Two delayed action bombs exploded in Turner’s works, Clydebank (J71.2) – MacPhail says a 1000kg bomb fell here (20.2)

02.45 Dr John MacKenzie joined rescue effort at Logan Street (MacLachlan’s cold storage) (J68.7)

02.45 Clydebank Firemaster sent message to UCBS for tea and rolls for 150 men (M22.2)

02.50 4 Ju88 of III/KG1 arrive over target.

03.00 Bomb on Clydebank Library above control centre (M36.2)

03.00 (estimate) At some point after 02.00 Blawarthill and Canniesburn Hospitals were full of casualties and ambulances were diverted to Robroyston and Killearn Hospitals. (J62.4)

03.14 incendiaries on Dudley Drive (J65.1)

03.25 End of lull which began at 02.00.  Incendiaries and bombs on existing fires at Yoker Distillery, Blythswood Shipyard, Halley’s tweed factory (J70.2)

03.30 Clydebank Control Centre asked District HQ in Glasgow for 8 more rescue parties, which were sent from Stirlingshire without delay (M43.1)

04.00 By this point 65 fire engines (“major units”) from outside forces were in Clydebank (M21.3)
Problems with teams from outside Clydebank arriving at fire station on Hall Street but unable to find a senior officer to direct them. (J73.2)
Decision to concentrate on Singer’s timber yard, Rothesay Dock, Radnor Park-Kilbowie district (M21.3)
Martin Chadwick, Glasgow Firemaster, decided to concentrate on oil tanks at Dalnottar. (J72.2)

05.30 last bomb on Clydebank (M26.2)

05.35 Bomb on Glenburn Street, Maryhill dropped by a lone, low-flying aircraft (J70.2).

06.25 ‘all clear’ sounds in Clydebank (M26.2)

06.30 dawn of Friday 14th March 1941
64 serious and potentially serious fires in Glasgow under control, but fires unchecked in Clydebank (J72.5)

“By dawn” all casualties had been cleared from Radnor Park Church Hall, a mobile surgical unit had been set up in Hardgate, a large convoy of ambulances from Airdrie had arrived at Dalmuir. (J63.2)

07.00 (estimate) 19-year old girl located at 69 Livingstone Street and rescue effort begins (based on M18.2, assuming bomb exploded at 22.00 and M says she was under the rubble for 14 hours)

07.30 Man rescued from Logan Street (Maclachlan’s cold storage) (J68.7)

07.50 meeting at Water Trust Office in Clydebank, engineer James MacWilliam and foreman George Aitkenhead had been trying to maintain water pressure all night. MacWilliam found to be injured.

08.00 Sir Steven Bilsland, District Civil Defence Commissioner, arrived in Clydebank (J71.7)
Lord Rosebery, Scottish Regional Commissioner for Civil Defence also arrived, unclear if he was with Bilsland (M22.2)

08.00 Mrs Hastie from Boreland Drive gives birth to son in Stobhill Hospital (J60.1)

08.15 Luftwaffe reconnaissance plane detected over Glasgow (J74.4)

08.30 Medical students from Radnor Park Church Hall get back to Western (M31.3)

08.30 (estimate) Rosebery toured town including Rothesay Docks where there were two fires, one unattended, and decided control was lacking (M22.2).  Decision to suspend fire chief in Clydebank in the early evening when it was clear the Germans were coming back (M23.1). Note J72.2 says Bilsland replaced senior fireman in Clydebank as “one of his first actions” suggesting this was earlier.

Delayed action bomb exploded near crater in Kilbowie Road / Montrose Street as repair squads from Glasgow and Dumbarton are working. (J73.5)

10.30 (estimate) Fire engines in Clydebank running out of petrol (“mid-morning”) (J72.4))

12.00 (estimate) 19-year old girl from 69 Livingstone Street rescued – see 07.00, M says rescue took 5 hours.

12.30 (estimate) Deputy Town Clerk arrived at Board of Trade in Bothwell Street seeking petrol (“at lunchtime”) (J72.4).  Eventually gets petrol from depot at Port Dundas, possibly around 13.30.

13.00 by this time 4000 meals sent into Clydebank by van (J73.5)

14.30 some semblance of order beginning to return to Clydebank according to Jeffrey – roads, rest centres, social services (J74.4)

Afternoon: 2 tons of candles, 6,000 matches, 70,000 cigarettes, 15lbs of tobacco sent to Clydebank (J73.6)

Afternoon: decision taken to evacuate Clydebank rest centres in case of further raids – 2500 to Vale of Leven, 1000 to Helensburgh, 1000 to Kirkintilloch (M49.2)

15.30 Clydebank 23 pumps still engaged in fire-fighting (M22.2)

18.00 Bilsland warned to prepare, second night of bombing likely (M40.3)

18.20 sunset.  At Dudley Drive rescue workers stopped work for the night, despite claims a boy’s voice had been heard from the rubble.  They restart work the following morning. (J65.5)

18.20 “by night”: 11 bodies recovered from Centre Street, 9 from 101 Nelson Street, 4 from 92 Nelson Street, and 4 from the back court of 146 Nelson Street. (J67.3)

20.40 sirens sounded in Clydebank (M40.4)
One tank at Old Kilpatrick still burning (M40.2)

20.55 (estimate) first bombs exploded in Drumchapel (based on “just before 21.00”) (J74.5)
Drumchapel Post Office hit (J74.6)

21.05 (estimate) bombs on Radnor Park, Kilbowie, Dalmuir (“ten minutes later” than “just before 21.00”). Dalmuir School hit. Steamer ‘Trevarrack’ sunk in Dalmuir Basin.  (J74.5)

21.45 delayed action bomb exploded at Firdon Crescent next to Drumchapel Station (J74.6)
Mines exploded at Kaystone Road, Waldemar Road at Chaplet Avenue, and Lincoln Avenue at junction with Archerhill Road. (J74.6)

22.45 Mine destroyed tenement in Allan Street.  Also destroys Methylating Company’s spirit works causing intense blaze (J75.3)

22.50 oil tanks at Old Kilpatrick bombed again (still on fire from previous night), German observer says flames 3000 metres high (J75.2)
Ten tanks at Dalnottar and Old Kilpatrick set alight (M41.1)

23.00 (estimate) Celia McGinty’s rescue efforts in Allan Street begin.

23.30 mine exploded on number 5 berth at Denny’s Shipyard, Dumbarton, damaging two navy ships under construction. (J75.7)

23.30 (estimate) Clydebank Control Centre asked Glasgow for 18 rescue parties, which were sent (“before midnight”) (M43.1)

23.48 pair of mines on Maryhill, first in a field, second on Kilmun Street (J76.1)

00.00 Mine explodes on Dumbarton Road, ARP depot on one side and number 131 on the other (M41.4)

00.10 (estimate) two unexploded mines at Cambuslang, either side of Clydebridge Iron Works (“just after midnight”) (J77.2)

00.15 bombs on Shieldhall Wharf and Stephen’s Shipyard (“a few minutes later” than “just after midnight”) (J77.2)

Bombs on Knightswood including one in Broadlie Drive, and another unexploded in Fereneze Crescent (J77.2) – placed here based on assumed chronology in Jeffrey.

Janetta Street Wardens’ Post hit at some point after midnight (M42.1)

01.15 bombs on Lochlibo Avenue and Fulwood Avenue in Knightswood (J77.2)

00.25 100 people from Kilmun Street had gathered at tramway depot in Celtic Street (J76.3)

02.10 Observer Corps reported table clear of enemy aircraft – suggesting bombing stopped before then? (J77.3)

02.24 McLintock says raid ended (Cromwell 58.3)

03.00 five more bombers (J77.3)

04.00 mine exploded in Clyde by mouth of River Cart when tug ‘Warrior’ was towing steamer ‘Ferncourt’.  Tug had to be beached (J77.4)

06.15 ‘all clear’ sounded in Clydebank (M47.1)

Saturday 15th March
Delayed action bomb exploded further down Kilbowie Road (from Montrose Street) damaging water main (J73.4)

Afternoon: German reconnaissance flight (M47.1)

Large scale evacuation by bus: 7000 to Vale of Leven, 3000 to Coatbridge / Airdrie / Hamilton, 1500 to Paisley/Bearsden/Milngavie, 2500 elsewhere. By evening, estimated that 40,000 had left Clydebank out of 50,000 population. (M49.3)

Sunday 16th March
07.15 Mine exploded in Princes Dock seriously damaging steam lighter ‘Pibroch’ and bringing down a crane (J60.4) – said to be same aircraft as dropped mine in Princes Dock (see 16th March)

Relief for Clydebank Sanitary Commissioner (J78.6)

Fire-fighting in Clydebank still continuing (J80.1) e.g. Livingstone Street (M21.2)

Afternoon Scottish Home and Health Dept official arrives to oversee burial of the dead – found around 220 bodies laid out in church hall, school and shed at cemetery. (J80.2)

Monday 17th March
Morning: police photograph bodies of Clydebank dead (J80.4)

Afternoon: bulldozer arrived in Clydebank from Inverrary and roads being cleared (J81.2)

Royal Engineers had begun dynamiting dangerous buildings (J81.2)

17.00 mass burial at Dalnottar (J81.2)

Tuesday 18th March
Craigiehall Street: moans heard from wreckage (“five days after the raid”) (J60.3)

Wednesday 19th March
08.10 Mrs McGeachan rescued from Craigiehall Street, died in hospital same day (J60.3)

Corpses at Nelson Street starting to decompose (J67.3)

11.00 demolition squad arrive at Peel Street, 20-30 people still missing (J65.2)

18.00 (estimate) four bodies recovered from Peel Street “by the evening” (J65.2)

Thursday 20th March
Morning: bodies of Jean Spence and her parents recovered at Peel St (J65.3)

Friday 21st March
Morning: groans from ruins of 31-39 Peel St (J65.4)
13.30 Fred Clarke brought out alive (J65.4)
18.30 Fred Clarke died in hospital (Western) (J65.4)
19.15 John Cormack brought out alive (J65.4)

120 Nelson Street: two severed female feet recovered (J68.1)

Friday 28th March
Last two bodies recovered from Kilmun Street (J76.7)

April
Mr Sutherland of 101 Nelson Street reports wife and children missing; two-day search finds nothing. (J68.2)

8th: incident post at Nelson Street closes. (J68.1)

10th: Nelson Street re-opens to traffic. (J68.1)

May

Middle of month: (estimate, based on “two months later”) Final body found at Logan Street (J69.2)

Thursday, 31 December 2015

Tottenham Court Road - 24th September 1940

The night blitz on London was into its third week when a bomb fell in Tottenham Court Road, about 200 yards north from the tube station and the east end of Oxford Street.  It caused a crater in the roadway and a gas main caught fire.  At least one vehicle was destroyed.  On the east side of the street the Central London YMCA was damaged; seven people were killed and two more fatally injured.  In the street close by a further three people died.
Across the street things were worse as a whole row of shops with flats above collapsed and some fires started.  Fortunately most of these were unoccupied but at 8 Tottenham Court Road the staff of an amusement arcade were caught in the collapsing building and seven people died.  Next door at the Blue Posts Public House, a further four people died.  Behind these properties in Hanway Street another person was fatally injured.
On the other side of the junction with Hanway Street two Cypriots were killed, probably at the Lyons Corner House and with two more people killed in the street, the total was 28 people killed or fatally injured.
Picture One (for which I acknowledge the copyright of Getty Images and hope they approve of the use I have put the photos to) show the view looking north up Tottenham Court Road the following morning:
The crater is clearly visible in the foreground; firemen are playing a hose on the ruins to the right in case a fair re-starts.  Various wardens and civil defence personnel are to be seen but the rescue effort seems to be over.  The building facade on the extreme right of the picture is the YMCA and the road junction just beyond it is Bedford Avenue.  The destruction to the (mainly empty) buildings on the west side of the street (to the left) is evident.
For Picture Two the photographer would have walked past the crater about fifty paces and turned around to look back:

We are looking at the west side of the street, the same buildings as on the left side of Picture One; the water jet from the firemen's hose can be seen coming from the left side of this Picture.  Again, the civil defence personnel present are seen standing in small groups and the rescue effort is obviously over.  Just above the water jet from the hose, on the left side of this picture, you can see some buildings in the distance; this is the site of the modern Centrepoint tower block.  Just in front of the buildings you may be able to make out a crowd of onlookers, possibly including people who worked in the shops now destroyed,
In terms of the places I mentioned at the start of this article, the rubble where the firemen are training their hose is Number 8, and the Blue Posts pub is the building mainly still standing just besides the rubble.
For Picture Three the photographer would have walked back past the crater, past the position from which Picture One was taken and about twenty yards further towards the crowd of onlookers we saw in the distance in Picture Two.  At the junction with Great Russell Street they would have turned and focused on the Blue Posts Public House across Tottenham Court Road:
The rubble to the right was the amusement arcade; a wrecked vehicle is in the middle of the street.  To the left of the building was the junction with Hanway Street and the building visible in the background is where one person was fatally injured (Hanway Works).
Picture Four widens the angle because the photographer has walked across the junction with Great Russell Street (over the photographer's right shoulder):


The left side of the Blue Posts is more clearly visible, as is the smoking rubble to the right (numbers 8-12 Tottenham Court Road) showing why the firemen were still dampening down in the earlier pictures.  The corner of the YMCA building is just visible in the top right.
Picture Five widens the view still further because the photographer appears to be standing in the main road now:

This seems to have been taken later in the morning than Pictures Three and Four because the firemen have done their work and no more smoke is coming from the rubble.  The wrecked vehicle is revealed to have had at six wheels and hence a truck seems likely.  For the first time there is a sense of urgency in the picture as a group of men seem to be hurrying past the wreckage.  The building on the extreme left of the shop is the Lyons Corner House.
Picture Six shows the equivalent view in the 1960s:

The extent of the wartime bomb damage is evident with all the pre-1940s buildings have been knocked down as far as the advert for Texaco.  On the corner of Hanway Street (now No Entry) the Blue Posts is back in business and the magic shop has replaced the amusement arcade.  The temporary walkway in the bottom right hand corner may suggest this was at the time when the old YMCA was being knocked down and the St Giles Hotel we see today was being built.
Picture Seven brings the story up to 2015:

Boots the Chemist now occupies the site of the Blue Posts and amusement arcade; only the buildings further up Hanway Street seem to be pre-1939.
Picture Eight shows an aerial view from 1947 (I acknowledge the copyright of Britain From Above and hope they approve of my use of their photo):

In the middle of the picture on a corner is a white tower: this is the YMCA building and Pictures Four, Five and Six above were taken from directly below the tower as we look at it.  Just to the left of the tower, across Tottenham Court Road, we can see the gap where numbers 6-12 would have stood.
Picture Nine shows the YMCA tower again, but this time from the (south) west looking (north) east, and in a pre-1939 view:

The buildings destroyed are visible across the road from the YMCA, closer to the camera.  Great Russell Street is just to the right of the tower; following the YMCA block to the left you come to the junction with Bedford Avenue, last see to the right of Picture One.
Picture Ten is the best modern equivalent I can produce, looking north with Centrepoint on the right:

The modern Boots the Chemist (and neighbouring shops) is the brown and cream building at the top of the picture on the left, and across the road are the four linked concrete arms of the building that replaced the YMCA.
To finish, Picture Eleven takes us back to 1940 and a view from the crater:

Michael Osborn was staying at the YMCA: "Late one night, when we were trying to get to sleep on mattresses in the gym in the basement, one of the larger bombs exploded just outside, in Tottenham Court Road. Most of the inside of our building was wrecked, an enormous lump of concrete landing on the bed I would have been sleeping in.  I had already decided to join the Royal Navy, and remember feeling intuitively that the way the building rocked must be what it would be like to be in a torpedoed ship; and so it prove two years later, when I was serving in a warship in the Mediterranean, escorting a convoy to Malta."
Pearl Sutton worked in the amusement arcade with her husband: "I was buried forty feet I am told.  It apparently was on the [newspaper] placards next morning.  Everyone was killed.  The manager, his son and several staff including my husband who I had only been married to for seven months.  So I was engaged, married and a widow at 21.  I understand it was a wall that saved me.  I was in a sort of alcove.  I remember being asked what religion I was while still being buried – having been thrown on my stomach, I was just able to talk and move my fingers slightly.  I was telling someone I felt they were walking over me – however I was asked if I knew what direction I was.  I can remember being dug out and there was great difficulty getting my feet out, consequently I’ve had bother ever since and I now wear a leg iron."
This account appeared in the book "Hospitals Under Fire":
“A Tuesday in the Autumn of 1940.
Red. (Raid on.)
Call out to YMCA Great Russell Street junction of Tottenham Court Road. Wilkins. One light party. With Mr Taber.  Mr Taber back and requested two more parties.  Woodward, three light.  E. Haynes five light with Mr Holman.  Getting out casualties, with many volunteers from YMCA.  Wilkins also working on Blue Post Public House.
Midnight. All parties back. St Pancras RP taking over Blue Post job.
Thus the log-book of the Holborn Rescue Party from eight o’clock to midnight that evening.  And this is what Wilkins has to say about it:
“There were eight of us in my lorry.  The gas-main was alight in the middle of the road and Jerry was up above.  The YMCA building was badly battered and the Blue Post public-house was down and burning.
Stretcher-bearers were busy with the first-aid party on the ground floor of the YMCA, where there was not much to be shifted, but a lot of dead and wounded owing to bomb blast in the road outside.  They took me to the top of the building, where there was a man in bed.  He was covered up with big slabs of breeze and a muck of dust and debris all over him with a chance of bringing more down if they tried to get him out.
I could hear him calling out ‘Over here ... over here.’ I man-handled that job.  The man came out all right and they soon had him on a stretcher.
Working my way down from that floor I ran into a man that was laying in a pool of blood the size of a dining-table.  Seeing they had first-aided him – with a tourniquet to stop the bleeding – we take a door and put him across it, and out he goes.  The next is a man with two legs broken.  We clear him and, an upturned table being handy, he is soon away.
Having finished at the YMCA – I counted more bombs come down while we were on the job – I was called to the Blue Post public-house.  There wasn’t much of the place left, and that was burning.  Behind it was a club room connected by a cubby-hole through which meals were passed.  They knew there was someone still in it.  The wardens had got three out by Hanway Street.  Then the top floors came down and shut it off.  What we had to do was find the cubby-hole and see if we could get through that way.
M’Culloch, a tough old Scot, was with me, sixty-five years if a day, a very big man and a fine worker.  Pity was, when we cleared the cubby-hole, it was 2 ft. 6 by 2 only.  All I could do to get through.  Mac couldn’t follow me.
Seeing the pub was well alight, and only a partitioned wall between it and the club-room, I asked them to clear a way out while I went in to do what I could.
I soon found the woman alive.  She was calling out, as loud and as cheerful as could be, from under a pile of rubbish.  The job looked bad.  The worst were two big piers laying off at an angle and in no way supported at the top, both likely to come down as we cleared the woman.  I began straight away to clear her head with my hands, then Freeman got through to help me, and the pair of us worked at both ends.
The more we worked, the better she behaved, calling out all the time and giving me instructions.  ‘Come on, Wilkie,’ she’d say, ‘there’s a bit more there.’  You see, she got my name quite quick.  At first I was lying on my chest, pushing my arm in and feeling round to find out what was keeping the big stuff off her.  Feeling my hand she said: ‘Take some of the dust out of my eyes, Wilkie.’  So I put my hand over her face to make her more comfortable, brushing and lifting buts away.
Pretty soon I knew she was lying all huddled up against the skirting-board and protected by a great flat stone which had come from I don’t know where.  It was making an angle against the wall.  Another smaller slab was over her head, leaning on the first and the wall.  Over all was three to four feet of debris.  All in, it was the trickiest job I ever had.  The fire was burning hard on the other side of the partition.  I was afraid it might come through, but more afraid I was working too fast for safety.
It certainly wasn’t appetizing.  We were getting drenched by the hoses, because they were trying to keep the fire off us, and smoke was pouring through all the time.
First we worked at the woman’s head, and so on down towards her feet.  She was a slight little thing, so small-made that as she lay there she was more like a child than a married woman.  We cleared her head and body first, then managed to release one leg, which came out with no shoe or stocking on.  The other was so trapped I couldn’t pull it out.
I said to her, ‘Try and turn yourself over a bit and see what you can do.’ Then, to our great relief, she pulled her own leg free.  Again it came right out of her stocking and shoe.  And so, quite barefooted, with only one light dress on her, she was at last on her feet, all smiling and still talking, and saying what an escape she’d had.  We offered to carry her over the broken stuff, but she would walk.  And she did actually walk over all that rubble and glass, which we found bad enough with our army boots on.
They out her on a stretcher seeing she was barefoot, and thinking she might go to pieces at any time.  That was the last I saw of her.  It was also the last job I did at the Blue Post, though we wre called out to another before the night watch ended.  Then I went home, and I’ll tell you a funny thing – though I was all right when I left the post, I could hardly knock at my own door.  Talk about going to pieces!  I’ll never blame anybody for that.  When I got inside there was I, trying to tell the Missus all about it, and crying like a child.”

THE PEOPLE WHO DIED
Hanway Street
NICHOLLS, NELLIE FLORENCE, age 42, OF 12A HANWAY STREET. WIFE OF J. NICHOLLS. DIED AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL.
Nellie Nicholls died at University College Hospital, at the north end of Tottenham Court Road, two days later. 
Nellie’s husband, John, was a motor-fitter.  In the National Probate Calendar, Nellie’s estate was valued at £470 and her home address given as 12a Hanway Works, Hanway Place.
Thanks to a 1947 advert we can tell the Hanway Works backed on to the Blue Post Public House (http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/images/a/a1/Im194709WW-CMC.jpg)
While the CWGC record does not link her to the incident on 24th September I have inferred this based on the close proximity of her home address to a scene of extensive bomb-damage and the lack of alternative bomb incidents in the immediate area.


Tottenham Court Road 6, Blue Posts PH
BAKER, JOHN ALFRED, age 25, OF 77 ARLINGTON ROAD. SON OF DAVID AND AMELIA BAKER, OF 13 CORPORATION BUILDINGS, FARRINGDON ROAD, E.C.1. DIED AT 6 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Arlington Road is in Camden Town, parallel to the High Street.  Number 77 still stands.

COGAN, DORIS MAY, age 24, OF 40 LINDROP STREET, FULHAM. DAUGHTER OF GEORGE PLUMLEY, OF 2 RAVENSWOOD AVENUE, BROMLEY, KENT; WIFE OF CHARLES RICHARD COGAN. DIED AT 6 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Married Fulham q2 1938.  Lindrop Road is just south of Chelsea Harbour, number 40 still stands.
Likely daughter of George Older (sic) Plumley and Kezia Elizabeth Johnson (married September 11th, 1910, at St Mary Magdalene in Bermondsey) – Kezia’s father (Doris’s grandfather) was a publican, giving a possible link to the Blue Posts pub.  Kezia died in 1920 aged 34.  George (Doris’s father) was a labourer, then a carter.
Doris’s husband, Charles (1915-1977) – may have re-married in 1949 to Bertha Skinner.

HAYES, THOMAS, age 61, OF 117 NEWINGTON BUTTS, LAMBETH. HUSBAND OF ELIZABETH HAYES. DIED AT 6 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
His home address has long been demolished.

TRITTON, WILLIAM, age 49, HUSBAND OF ALICE TRITTON, OF 26 SUTTON LANE, CHISWICK, MIDDLESEX. DIED AT 6 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Born 1st August 1891 in Chiswick, son of a cart driver.  As a child known as Willie (1901 Census).  In 1911 Census occupation given as “Engineer worker”.  Married Alice Gould in 1915.
One child, William Ernest Tritton (1916-1974), an iron and metal sheet worker in 1942.
Alice (William’s wife) died on 3rd March 1942, estate valued at £260.
Suttons Lane North still exists, uncertain if this is the same as Suttons Lane in CWGC.


Tottenham Court Road 8
BOLAND, RONALD RICHARD, age 14, SON OF ALFRED AND CONSTANCE BOLAND, OF 95 ALBERT STREET. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Albert Street is in Camden, close to the home of John Alfred Baker who died at the Blue Posts PH next door
From Ronald’s birth record, we know his mother’s maiden name was Hutchi(n)son.  Constance Mary Hutchison (b. 3rd July 1904, d. 1973) married Thomas Alfred David Boland (b. 31st March 1897, d. 1961) in 1924.  Thomas had been in the Navy from 1914-1923
Alfred Henry Arthur born 1924
Ronald Richard born 1926
Constance Dorothea born 1928
Alan born 1935
Ronald’s older brother, Alfred, died in the battle of Arnhem in 1944, aged 20.  He was serving with 7 Platoon, S Company, 1st Parachute Battalion.  In Oosterbeek on the western edge of Arnhem he was shot by a sniper and buried in the garden of a house on Utrechtsweg; his body was later re-interred in the CWGC Cemetery:
From 1949 Constance (Ronald’s mother) is listed as living alone.

MOSS, ARTHUR, age 33, OF 52 BROADWICK STREET. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
52 Broadwick Street still standing.

SEILER, JOSEPH SAUL SOLLY, age 38, OF 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD. SON OF MARCUS AND BERTHA SEILER, OF 100 OSBALDESTON ROAD, STAMFORD HILL; HUSBAND OF HELEN SEILER. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
and
SEILER, HENRY, age 17, OF 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD. SON OF HELEN SEILER, AND OF JOSEPH SAUL SOLLY SEILER. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Helen Seiler, wife and mother, lived to 1982 (born 1900).

SMITH, THOMAS GEORGE, age 18, OF 63 MYDDLETON STREET, ROSEBERY AVENUE, FINSBURY. SON OF MR. AND MRS. A. E. SMITH. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.

SUTTON, EDWARD ERNEST, age 26, OF 144 HARRINGTON ROAD. SON OF MRS. C. SUTTON, OF 4 ST. JOHN'S STREET, MARGATE, KENT; HUSBAND OF PEARL SUTTON. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Married Pearl L Hamilton in q1 1940 in Lambeth

WOODHOUSE, ROBERT JOHN, age 46, OF 10 ABERDEEN PLACE, ST. MARYLEBONE. SON OF AMY WOODHOUSE. DIED AT 8 TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.


Great Russell Street YMCA
ADLESTONE, CYRIL, age 21, F.A.P. MEMBER; OF Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET. SON OF DAVID AND SARAH ADLESTONE, OF 20 NEWTON PARK VIEW, LEEDS. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.

EDWARDS, HENRY CHARLES LEWIS, age 36, OF Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET. SON OF ALICE EDWARDS, OF WHITE HOUSE, BOURNE END BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., SOUTH TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.

FISHER, JOHN BERNARD, age 17, HOME GUARD; OF Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET. SON OF HERBERT J. AND EMMA C. FISHER, OF BRANDON ROAD, WATTON, NORFOLK. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.

KEOGH, AGUSTIN WILLIAM, age 49, HUSBAND OF ETHEL KEOGH, OF 26 SEKFORDE STREET, CLERKENWELL. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.

RICHARDSON, MARCUS WILLIAM, age 30, OF 42 ERPINGHAM ROAD, PUTNEY. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.

STEWART, PERCY HAMILTON, age 57, OF 44 BAYHAM STREET, W.1. SON OF THOMAS AND SARAH STEWART, OF MARSLAND ROAD, BROOKLANDS, CHESHIRE. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.

TEMPLE, DAVID EDWARD, age 18, HOME GUARD. SON OF ALFRED AND DOROTHY ROSS TEMPLE, OF 76 TYRONE ROAD, THORPE BAY, ESSEX. INJURED 24 SEPTEMBER 1940, AT Y.M.C.A. HEADQUARTERS, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD; DIED AT MIDDLESEX HOSPITAL.
Born September 1922. Entered company service 6 May 1940 at Southend as a clerk in the Accident Department. Was a member of the Home Guard. Evacuated to Aldwych from Southend on 01 July 1940. Stayed in the London Central YMCA at Tottenham Court Road London then moved to basement shelter at Aldwych with Mr W J Robinson, Mr F C Schilling and Mr J Ellis Pilgrim. Decided on 24 September 1940 to sleep at the YMCA was injured in air raid hit on the building and died in Middlesex Hospital.

WILLS, NORMAN LEONARD, age 20, OF Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET, HOLBORN. SON OF ALFRED CHRISTOPHER LEONARD AND ALICE EMILY ISABELLA WILLS, OF 16 EAST PARK PARADE, NORTHAMPTON. INJURED 24 SEPTEMBER 1940, AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET; DIED AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL.

WILSON, COLIN CAMPBELL, age 5, OF 4 VASSALL ROAD, STOCKWELL. SON OF COLIN CAMPBELL WILSON AND ISABELLA WILSON, OF 6 BUTTERMERE STREET, GRANGETOWN, SUNDERLAND, CO. DURHAM. DIED AT Y.M.C.A., GREAT RUSSELL STREET.


Tottenham Court Road Fun fair        
NORMAN, CECIL ARMSTRONG, age 41, HEAD FIREMAN, LONDON UNIVERSITY FIRE SERVICE; OF 92 REEDWORTH STREET, KENNINGTON. SON OF HELLEN ELIZABETH NORMAN, OF 34 GOLDEN MILLER LANE, POLEGATE, SUSSEX, AND OF THE LATE JOHN BEECROFT NORMAN. DIED AT FUN FAIR, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.

SIMPSON, EDWIN CHARLES, age 50, OF 26 MORNINGTON CRESCENT. SON OF ALEXANDER FORD SIMPSON. DIED AT FUN FAIR, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.

SPINER, IVY WINIFRED, age 26, OF 110 THEOBALD ROAD, HOLBORN. WIFE OF A.C.2 M. SPINER, R.A.F. DIED AT FUN FAIR, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
Miss Ivy Winifred Baker killed on 24th September 1940 when an enemy bomb struck an amusement arcade at 8 Tottenham Court Road, London where she was working. She was aged 26. Her brother Walter had been killed three months earlier when his submarine Grampus was depth-charged in the Mediterranean. (See also Mrs I. W. Spinner [sic] and Stoker W. E. Baker, RN)
Interred at Margate Cemetery


Tottenham Court Road
IRVING, GEORGE HENRY, age 39, OF 6 FELLBRIGG ROAD, CAMBERWELL. SON OF THE LATE ARTHUR AND ELIZABETH IRVING, OF 41 THURLOW STREET, ST. PANCRAS. INJURED AT TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD; DIED SAME DAY ON WAY TO CHARING CROSS HOSPITAL.


Tottenham Court Road Lyons Corner House
STYLIANOU, ANDRONIKOS, age 28, OF VIZAKIA, NICOSIA DISTRICT, CYPRUS. DIED AT LYONS CORNER HOUSE, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD.
The Lyons Corner House was at the junction of TCR and Hanway Street, with an entrance on Oxford Street
and this suggests the link between the two Cypriots.
Oxford Street
HUSSEIN, SEFFER, age 32, CYPRIOT NATIONAL; OF 8 STEPHEN STREET. INJURED AT OXFORD STREET; DIED SAME DAY AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL.


Oxford Street 6
McELLIGOTT, JOAN, age 19, OF 6 OXFORD STREET, ST. MARYLEBONE. DAUGHTER OF TIMOTHY MCELLIGOTT, OF CLAHANE, TRALEE, CO. KERRY, IRISH REPUBLIC. INJURED AT 6 OXFORD STREET, DIED SAME DAY ON WAY TO CHARING CROSS HOSPITAL.